Recipe: Teriyaki Pork Tenderloin

teriyaki-pork-recipe

March break is behind us now, but it was so decadent when it came to pulling together family dinners. Most nights, we had an extra grown up around to either help in the kitchen or keep the kids entertained. We ate out a few times and got fed by Grandma one night, too. 

On the days I was on my own with the kids, it was still a nice pace. Normally, I'm coming or going from an after-school activity at the exact time my kids need to be eating — because they are S-T-A-R-V-I-N-G after a long day! The break gave us lots of time to get home from our outings and get dinner on the table with minimal drama.

We're back in the thick of a busy schedule again now. Our family is big and our activities are many. I've also taken on some new roles and responsibilities, in addition to my writing work, and we've had to be even more organized than usual.

The night before we returned to school and work and activities, I did a big grocery shop to prepare for a few days of lunch boxes and two night's worth of dinners. We tend to shop on a three day cycle, so that we're meal planning for two days ahead. I find a full week of planning never pans out, but every three days works well to cover any last minute changes to our schedule. 

Monday mornings, JB gets up first with the boy who has an earlier school start than his sisters. While dad is hanging out with him, he makes the school lunches for the day. He walks him to his bus stop and then leaves for work. I get the girls up and ready for school and, while they're getting themselves breakfast, I use the time to drink my coffee and do a quick dinner prep if I can (read: if we're not scrambling through any forgotten homework or piano practice).

This week it was my teriyaki pork tenderloin recipe. It takes less than five minutes to do the prep and it tastes so great. It's one of my youngest daughter's favourite meals. 

My mom taught me to cook using my intuition, when it comes to seasoning and flavouring food, so a lot of the meals I make are an improvisation. 

Here's my recipe for the teriyaki marinade (give or take a little):

  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1-2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp canola or grapeseed oil
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp minced ginger
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar

I add the pork tenderloin to a large Ziploc bag, throw in the ingredients, seal the bag and then give it all a really good massage before throwing it into the refrigerator for the day (in the sealed bag). If you prefer to use a dish, I would whisk the ingredients together in a small bowl before pouring over the pork tenderloin. 

When we get home from school and work, I pop the pork tenderloin into an oven-safe dish and cover loosely with aluminum foil to keep it from drying out. I bake it at 420 degrees for about 25 minutes. Slice open the centre and check for pinkness (adjust cooking time as required).

When it's fully cooked, I slice the tenderloin into medallions and serve it with rice or egg noodles and a vegetable. 

Give it a try and let me know what you think.

 

 

Time For The Holidays: Thank you, Flipp

holiday-time

My sister and I made our way around the table—each of us folding the festive napkins just so—as we set the kids' table for the dinner ahead.

I looked at her when we met at the last seat and said, Feels strange and wonderful, doesn't it?

For the first time in over a decade, no kid in sight and no sounds of mooooooom being called from the other room. Between us we have kids old enough to watch out for younger siblings/cousins and wise enough to handle a lot of the moments that used to need a parent to fix.

One of our guests was there with her toddler and newborn baby, and as we sat down to dinner my sister and I tried to reminisce about those days and how it felt to eat cold plates of food and miss out on most of the adult conversation. But it seems our memories were blurry. We said, but it must have happened to us, even though it felt too distant to remember moments so recent. We laughed with an oh well and took turns holding the baby instead.

flipp-app

This year, I had a full day to dash from shop to shop finding the perfect ingredients for our well-planned Christmas feast. I was able to take my time making the best choices for staying within our holiday budget by using my favourite Flipp app, and that gave me some room for extra surprises (hello, crab legs!). 

But still my eyes wandered to the babies accompanying their weary parents through the shops and to the newborn in my dinner guest's arms. 

holiday-time

How can those days already be behind me? Why were they in such a hurry to leave? 

Where have those stolen moments with the weight of a warm, flushed child on my lap at the table (so I could stay in the company of the adults awhile longer) already gone?

The other night, I happily walked the hallways with that brand new baby, so her mama could eat a warm meal. And when I came back to my table and reluctantly handed her over, my dinner had gone cold.

As I ate it, those memories came back to me more clearly. And I knew why it was so easy to forget the taste of less-than-perfect food.

 It was made and served with pinches of love and then abandoned with dashes of love.

And that made it taste just as good.

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This post was sponsored by Flipp who helped me buy my holiday groceries this season. I am a long-time and weekly user of this easy-to-use app for planning my weekly grocery lists and saving money. I also use it to find the best prices for non-food items. I enter my list and instantly know where the best prices in my area can be found. I can clip from flyers and download coupons for added savings. It takes the same amount of time it does to scrawl a list (except now you won't lose it before you leave for the store). So, yes, even parents with young babies can add it to their smartphones. 

Stories about my family life, as always, are mine.