The Tale of An Accidental Squash And A Really Good Pot of Soup

squash-soup

I've been working my way through this new vegan cookbook and one of the recipes I had my eye on has a beautiful photo, including what I mistakenly thought was butternut squash (it's actually sweet potato). Once I decided to make it, I headed to the grocery store and grabbed the biggest butternut squash in the display — fully intending to use it right away.

Well, you all know what happened next. I had to go back to the grocery store (hey, with four kids I'm there every day anyway) to get the sweet potatoes. So the squash held court on a patch of highly coveted counter space in our kitchen.

My husband does 90 percent of the kitchen clean up (since I'm the one creating 90 percent of the kitchen mess), so it was left to him to pick up and put down that squash each and every time he wiped down the counters. I knew I could get away with it for a few days, until finally and predictably he casually and cautiously asked, Are you using this squash for anything? 

I know how much he appreciates the effort I put into feeding our family, and he never questions how I go about doing it. But that huge squash was really getting on his nerves. 

Most of the week's meals are filled with tried-and-true recipes. I just can't take a chance with food experimentation when I'm facing hungry kids and limited time — and squash would definitely qualify as an experiment if you ask my children. I do my best to cook up a batch of vegetarian soup or stew for the grown up lunches, but I was finding it hard to think of something to do with that accidental squash.  

And so it happened that as I was flipping through my binder of recipes for the weekday homemade chicken noodle soup that I know everyone will eat, another recipe fell out and caught my attention. Its main ingredient is squash. 

But that's not all that made me glad to have found it. The recipe was given to us by a chef at a restaurant we visited what feels like a lifetime ago. We had been camping with three very young children in Prince Edward County, and my sweetheart planned a romantic (and we'll use that term loosely here since we had three kids with us) dinner at a local restaurant called the Waring House. He'd read about it in the paper, I believe, and knew we'd both appreciate the use of locally sourced food. 

Except — if memory serves — we didn't really get to savour the taste of any of it. I don't think it was one of the better eating-out-with-toddlers-and-babies experiences we've ever had, and I don't think it was for any of the patrons that were dining with us that night, either. We were seated in a quiet room with a beautiful view and a very cranky baby. I think we took turns standing outside with her, while the other parent coaxed the kids to hurry up and finish their food already. 

Maybe my soup went cold or I didn't get a chance to finish it, but somehow we came away with a printed copy of the chef's recipe, and it's been sitting in my binder waiting to be made ever since.

Tonight, my husband will come home from a long day at work, and we'll have the soup while it's still warm. And we'll catch up with one another, because no one will have to go outside with a screaming baby. Maybe we'll have a laugh about that disastrous night, maybe we won't. But I do know we'd both say we are glad we tried it anyway. 

And I don't mean the soup. 

 

Squash Medley Ginger Maple Soup

Ingredients:

  • 1 large squash, baked
  • 2 cups of sweet potatoes, baked
  • 2 cups chopped onions
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 4 cups of vegetable stock
  • 1/2 cup pure maple syrup
  • salt and pepper to taste

Method:

Place the squash and the sweet potatoes in a 350 degree oven, halved, cut side down on a parchment lined baking sheet and roast for one hour. Sweat the onions until transparent in the oil and add the cayenne and ginger. Add the carrots, squash, sweet potatoes and stock and simmer for 40 minutes. Puree this mixture in a food processor in batches to get a smooth consistency (I used a hand blender). Return the soup to the pot and add the maple syrup. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serves six. 

 

 

 

Sarah Slean: And What Her Music Means To Me

sarah-slean

I'm supposed to be making dinner so I can rush out the door and get my tiny pianist to his lesson. But I've made the mistake of putting a Sarah Slean vinyl on the turntable in our front room. 

There's always music playing as a background soundtrack to the activity vibrating through our home. Tonight, I wander away from my bubbling pot and closer to the sound of Sarah's voice and the gorgeous strings that rise and fall like a tide that can't decide whether to come in for the night or run away from the sun. 

The curtains are still open in the front window and the light is starting to fade outside. I know my neighbours can see me, but I close my eyes, raise my arms and move them with the music anyway — as though I'm the one conducting the musicians. I'm not graceful, but it doesn't matter. I am only moving for myself and because of what I feel when I hear those sounds. 

I brought my youngest child to the symphony for the first time when she was four. During a particularly moving piece, I glanced over to see her head tilted back on the seat, eyes blinking rapidly, and lower lip quivering. There were tears sliding from her eyes. I reached for her hand and she whispered, Mama, I'm starting to feel a little bit sad, because the music is so beautiful.

I understood what she meant. It's what I've always appreciated about Sarah's music — every song is an invitation to step into the emotions and thoughts too easily lost in our busyness. And each time I listen to her songs, they call me back again: to learn something new, to reflect on something past, to forgive, to let go, to love. 

It's been a 15 year journey for me and in honour of the value she places on generosity, when it comes to creating and sharing her music, Sarah chose some of her long-time supporters to attend an intimate performance for the launch her of her ninth studio album, Metaphysics. You have to choose those who choose you, she told us. I am without the right words to describe what it was like to sit inches from the beautiful string instruments and to watch Sarah perform on her beloved childhood piano. 

Sarah released her first EP, Universe, at age nineteen. If that doesn't hint at her extraordinary talent, then let me share that she is not only an accomplished poet, artist, songwriter and pianist but also an accomplished string composer, who has written four original scores for 21-piece string orchestras as well as two string quartets. The strings on her double album, Land & Sea are absolutely exquisite and it seems we will be treated to more of the same on the newest album

Sarah Slean is, in the words of TIME magazine, one of the most compelling acts Canada has to offer and you shouldn't wait another minute to hear for yourself. 

I've created a playlist of my favourite songs to date. This list will grow in a matter of days when the album is released on April 7th (I'm already drawn to Loved Well). You can pre-order the album on PledgeMusic until the 1st.

Canada needs to celebrate its artists and you won't go wrong with Sarah.

Recipe: Teriyaki Pork Tenderloin

teriyaki-pork-recipe

March break is behind us now, but it was so decadent when it came to pulling together family dinners. Most nights, we had an extra grown up around to either help in the kitchen or keep the kids entertained. We ate out a few times and got fed by Grandma one night, too. 

On the days I was on my own with the kids, it was still a nice pace. Normally, I'm coming or going from an after-school activity at the exact time my kids need to be eating — because they are S-T-A-R-V-I-N-G after a long day! The break gave us lots of time to get home from our outings and get dinner on the table with minimal drama.

We're back in the thick of a busy schedule again now. Our family is big and our activities are many. I've also taken on some new roles and responsibilities, in addition to my writing work, and we've had to be even more organized than usual.

The night before we returned to school and work and activities, I did a big grocery shop to prepare for a few days of lunch boxes and two night's worth of dinners. We tend to shop on a three day cycle, so that we're meal planning for two days ahead. I find a full week of planning never pans out, but every three days works well to cover any last minute changes to our schedule. 

Monday mornings, JB gets up first with the boy who has an earlier school start than his sisters. While dad is hanging out with him, he makes the school lunches for the day. He walks him to his bus stop and then leaves for work. I get the girls up and ready for school and, while they're getting themselves breakfast, I use the time to drink my coffee and do a quick dinner prep if I can (read: if we're not scrambling through any forgotten homework or piano practice).

This week it was my teriyaki pork tenderloin recipe. It takes less than five minutes to do the prep and it tastes so great. It's one of my youngest daughter's favourite meals. 

My mom taught me to cook using my intuition, when it comes to seasoning and flavouring food, so a lot of the meals I make are an improvisation. 

Here's my recipe for the teriyaki marinade (give or take a little):

  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1-2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp canola or grapeseed oil
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp minced ginger
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar

I add the pork tenderloin to a large Ziploc bag, throw in the ingredients, seal the bag and then give it all a really good massage before throwing it into the refrigerator for the day (in the sealed bag). If you prefer to use a dish, I would whisk the ingredients together in a small bowl before pouring over the pork tenderloin. 

When we get home from school and work, I pop the pork tenderloin into an oven-safe dish and cover loosely with aluminum foil to keep it from drying out. I bake it at 420 degrees for about 25 minutes. Slice open the centre and check for pinkness (adjust cooking time as required).

When it's fully cooked, I slice the tenderloin into medallions and serve it with rice or egg noodles and a vegetable. 

Give it a try and let me know what you think.